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R.W. SYMONDS - ROBERT WEMYSS SYMONDS

R.W. SYMONDS - ROBERT WEMYSS SYMONDS

Postby RichardWSymonds » Tue Feb 02, 2016 1:07 pm

R.W. SYMONDS - I AM NOT HE

"Victorian Furniture" by R.W. Symonds

http://public-northwestern.rhcloud.com/ ... monds.html


https://archive.org/search.php?query=cr ... 89-1958%22

creator:"Symonds, R. W. (Robert Wemyss), 1889-1958"

WEMYSS
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Wemyss

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The present state of old English furniture

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The present state of old English furniture

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Symonds, R. W. (Robert Wemyss), 1889-1958 texts
Topic: Furniture
Last edited by RichardWSymonds on Tue Feb 02, 2016 8:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: R.W. SYMONDS - I AM NOT HE

Postby RichardWSymonds » Tue Feb 02, 2016 2:02 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Wemyss

WEMYSS (as in Robert Wemyss Symonds : R.W. Symonds)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Wemyss

James Wemyss's great-grandson married Millicent, daughter of Lady Augusta Gordon,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Augusta_Gordon
and illegitimate granddaughter of William IV of the United Kingdom.[2] Their son, Michael Wemyss, married Lady Victoria Cavendish-Bentinck, last surviving god-daughter of Queen Victoria.[2]
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/peopl ... 35368.html



Letter published in West Sussex County Times (January 14 2016 - "Exploration of 'hidden histories'") and West Sussex Gazette (January 20 2016 - "Exhibition on political history tells many an untold story")

http://www.wscountytimes.co.uk/news/let ... -1-7160212

Dear Editor

Horsham Museum's 2015 Exhibition on political history tells many an untold story.

Horsham had a reputation of being one of the country's most corrupt towns in 1295AD. In that year, when Parliament was first called, a parliamentary seat was sold for £4000 in which £80,000 went on bribes. This was at a time when only 52 people could vote in the town - often for just a figurehead who was drafted in by the local Lord, or at the request of the King.

As Jeremy Knight of the Horsham Museum says: "The history of politics and Parliament is a fascinating story. Corruption was endemic at one point"

The 2015 Exhibition, marking the 750th Anniversary when Parliament was first called, also tells the untold story of the British Union of Fascists (BUF), led by Oswald Mosley.
Horsham had a BUF base in West Street and Denne Road - with the West Sussex Headquarters in Marine Parade, Worthing - dubbed the "The Munich of the South Coast" (see photograph attached).

The long-serving local MP at the time, representing both Horsham and Worthing, was Edward Turnour - 6th Earl of Winterton. It is claimed he was in sympathy with Oswald Mosley's politics during those pre-war years. After the war, he became Baron Turnour of Shillinglee in the County of Sussex, which gave him a seat in the House of Lords until the title became extinct on his death in 1962.

In 1910, when the Baron was a young man of 27, the UK Times reported he was engaged to Ivy Gordon-Lennox (whose uncle was the 7th Duke of Richmond). Ivy's mother was none too pleased, and placed a notice in the New York Times to state there was no such engagement!
In 1915, Ivy married William Cavendish-Bentinck, Marquess of Titchfield, and then became Duchess of Portland.

In 1924, Baron Turnour married the Honourable Cecilia Monica Wilson, daughter of Charles Wilson, 2nd Baron Nunburnholme (and Lady Majorie Cecilia Wynn-Carrington).

Such 'hidden histories' are no longer hidden at Horsham Museum's 2015 Exhibition. It's worth a visit.


Yours sincerely


Richard W. Symonds
The Ifield Society
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Re: R.W. SYMONDS - I AM NOT HE

Postby RichardWSymonds » Tue Feb 02, 2016 4:26 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bentinck_family

Bentinck family

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
For other uses, see Bentinck (disambiguation).

Bentinck

noble house
Bentinck-Wappen.png
Country Flag of the Netherlands.svg Netherlands,
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg United Kingdom
Titles Netherlands: Baron Bentinck, Count Bentinck†; HRE: Count Bentinck (Imperial Count); England: Baron Cirencester, Viscount Woodstock, Earl of Portland; Great Britain: Marquess of Titchfield†, Duke of Portland†.
Founded 14th century
Founder Johan Bentinck
Ethnicity Dutch
The Bentinck family is a prominent family belonging to both Dutch and British nobility. Its members have served in the armed forces and as ambassadors and politicians, including Governor General of India and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. The family is related to the British Royal Family via Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother's maternal Cavendish-Bentinck line.

Contents [hide]
1 History
2 Today
3 Notable members
4 Legacy
5 References
6 External links
History[edit]
The name Bentinck is a patronymic variation of the Old Germanic name Bento. The family is originally from the East of the Netherlands, and is regarded as Uradel noble, or noble from earliest times. The oldest known ancestor is Johan Bentinck, who is mentioned in documents between 1343 and 1386 and owned land near Heerde.

An important British branch was founded by Hans Willem Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland who accompanied William Henry, Prince of Orange to England during the Glorious Revolution. The head of this line was initially given the title of Earl of Portland, later Duke of Portland.

In 1732 the title Graf (Count) Bentinck, of the Holy Roman Empire, was created for William Bentinck, son of the 1st Earl of Portland. A Royal Licence of 1886 was created which allowed the use of this title in England; it continues to be held by Tim Bentinck, 12th Earl of Portland and his heirs. Another branch with the title Count existed in the Netherlands, but died out in the male line.

The Dutch and British branches of the family continue to exist and belong to both the Dutch nobility and British nobility.

Today[edit]
The Netherlands Bentinck family estate since the 16th century, Schoonheten House, is situated between the villages Heeten and Raalte in Overijssel. The area contains 5 square kilometres of forests and cultivated land. Nowadays, the family mainly earns its living by forestry, agriculture and renting holiday houses. The British branch of the family owns Bothal Castle (Bothal Estates) in Northumberland and Welbeck Abbey (Welbeck Estates), the ancestral seat of the Dukes of Portland in Nottinghamshire.

Notable members[edit]
William Bentinck, 1st Earl of Portland (1649–1709), a Dutch and English nobleman, and a friend of King William III
Henry Bentinck, 1st Duke of Portland (1682–1726), son of the 1st Earl of Portland, and a British politician and colonial statesman
William Bentinck, 1st Count Bentinck (1704–1774), son of the 1st Earl of Portland
William Bentinck, 2nd Duke of Portland (1709–1762), a British peer
John Bentinck (1737–1775), Royal Navy captain, inventor and member of Parliament
William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland (1738–1809), British politician and Prime Minister twice (1783 & 1807-9).
Carel, Baron Bentinck (1751–1825), a famous Lieutenant General in the Dutch army
Berend Hendrik, Baron Bentinck tot Buckhorst (1753–1830), a Dutch soldier and statesman
Willem Gustaaf Frederik Bentinck, 2nd Count Bentinck (1762–1835), a Dutch politician, and son of the 1st Count Bentinck
Charles Ferdinand, Count Bentinck (1764–1811), a Dutch politician and colonial statesman
William Bentinck (1764–1813), vice-admiral in the British Navy
Adolf Carel, Baron Bentinck van Nijenhuis (1764–1837), a Dutch politician
William Bentinck, 4th Duke of Portland (1768–1854), a British politician
Lord William Bentinck (1774–1839), a British Governor General of India
Arnold Adolf, Baron Bentinck van Nijenhuis (1798–1868), a Dutch politician, son of Adolf Carel, Baron Bentinck van Nijenhuis
William Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, 5th Duke of Portland (1800–1879), a British aristocratic eccentric who preferred to live in seclusion
Lord George Bentinck (1802–1848), son of the 4th Duke of Portland and a British Conservative politician
Charles William Frederick Cavendish-Bentinck (1817–1865), great grandfather Queen Elizabeth II
William Cavendish-Bentinck, 6th Duke of Portland (1857–1943), a British Conservative politician
Cecilia Cavendish-Bentinck (1862–1938), grandmother of Queen Elizabeth II
Reverend Charles Donald Bentinck (1866–1940) presided over Dornoch Cathedral, Dornoch, Scotland, from 1906–1936 and was instrumental in the extensive renovations occurring in the 1920s. He authored the book Dornoch Cathedral and Parish published in 1926.
Lady Ottoline Morrell, née Cavendish-Bentinck (1873–1938), British society hostess
Bernhard Bentinck (1877–1931), English cricketer
Reverend Sir Charles Bentinck (1879–1955), British diplomat who, after retirement, became an Anglican priest
William Cavendish-Bentinck, 7th Duke of Portland (1893–1977), a British Conservative politician
Henry Bentinck, 11th Earl of Portland, 7th Count Bentinck (1919–1997), a British non-conformist intellectual, concerned about the environment
Udo Willem, Baron Bentinck (born 1940), a well-known Dutch Judge
Tim Bentinck, 12th Earl of Portland, 8th Count Bentinck (born 1953), plays David Archer in The Archers on BBC Radio 4 and is a British voice artist and actor
Legacy[edit]
Bentinck Island near Victoria, British Columbia at 48°18′54.08″N 123°32′30.32″W may have been named after Lord George Bentinck.[1]
North and South Bentinck Arms, inlets off Burke Channel, were named after William Cavendish-Bentinck, 3rd Duke of Portland by Captain Vancouver in 1793.[2]:48 North Bentinck Arm is significant in the history of Canada because it was here in 1793 that Sir Alexander Mackenzie completed the first recorded transcontinental crossing of North America by a European north of Mexico.
HMS Bentinck, Royal Navy ships named after Captain John Bentinck.
After Kaiser Wilhelm II fled to the Netherlands at the end of World War I, he was housed at Kasteel Amerongen, belonging to Count Bentinck.
HMS Portland (F79) is a type 23 frigate (Duke class) named after the Dukes of Portland. It is the eighth ship to hold the title, but the first to be named after the Portland family, rather than Portland Harbour.[verification needed]
Bentinck Street, near Cavendish Square in the West End of London, bears the family name.

Welbeck Abbey


Schoonheten Manor


Bothal Castle


1920 Coat of arms


Coat of arms of the Cavendish-Bentinck family
References[edit]
Jump up ^ "Bentinck Island". BC Geographical Names.
Jump up ^ Walbran, Captain John T. (1971), British Columbia Place Names, Their Origin and History (Facsimile reprint of 1909 ed.), Vancouver/Toronto: Douglas & McIntyre, ISBN 0-88894-143-9
External links[edit]
Marek, Miroslav. "Bentinck Family tree". genealogy.euweb.cz.
Authority control
VIAF: 35260271 GND: 119155966
Categories: Bentinck familySurnamesDutch familiesDutch noble familiesNoble familiesBarons of the Netherlands
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Re: R.W. SYMONDS - I AM NOT HE

Postby RichardWSymonds » Tue Feb 02, 2016 4:32 pm

CHARLES BENTINCK-BUDD

http://spartacus-educational.com/Charle ... k_Budd.htm

British HistoryAmerican HistoryThe First World WarThe Second World WarFranceGermanyRussiaFootballHomeIndexLatest AdditionsResourcesAuthorBlogNewsletterNews Online

British History > The Second World War > Charles Bentinck Budd

Charles Bentinck Budd
Sections
Charles Bentinck Budd's Political Development
British Union of Fascists
Fascism in Worthing
Warwick Street Riot
Charles Bentinck Budd and Harry Jones
Worthing and Nazi Germany
Charles Bentinck Budd Interned
Primary Sources
Charles Bentinck Budd
Charles Bentinck Budd was born in Godstone, Surrey, on 16th August 1897. His father, Harry Bentinck Budd, had inherited a large fortune, but this had virtually disappeared by this time and his drunken behaviour had persuaded his mother to emigrate to Australia, leaving her son with an abusive father.

At the age of sixteen he joined the Junior Division of an Officer's Training Corps in Salisbury. On the outbreak of the First World War he lied about his age to become a member of the 5th Dragoon Guards. He fought on the Western Front and was eventually commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Royal East Kent regiment.

At the Battle of Loos in 1915 he was badly injured when he was hit by three machine-gun bullets, one of which lodged in his brain. Budd was invalided home with a silver plate in his skull and a severe disability pension. For the rest of his life he suffered paralysis of his right hand. He also had intermittent bouts of blinding headaches and occasional loss of memory and found reading difficult. In 1918 he returned to France as an Acting Captain in the Labour Corps and was involved in the repair and maintenance of highways and bridges.

Charles Bentinck Budd's Political Development
A strong opponent of the Russian Revolution he attempted to enlist in the White Army fighting the Red Army in Russia. When he was rejected on health grounds, he joined the Auxiliary Division of the Royal Ulster Constabulary, serving in Dublin. In 1921 he formed a company producing pressed steel. When this ended in failure he moved to Italy where he exporting flowers to Britain. While in Italy he witnessed Benito Mussolini gaining power. In 1925 the British government commissioned Budd to write a report on the regime.

In 1926 Budd moved to Worthing and lived at Greenville House in Grove Road. Budd was elected Vice President of the local branch of the British Legion. Shortly afterwards, on 31st March 1930, Budd, standing as an Independent, was returned unopposed to the Offington Ward of the West Sussex County Council. His biographer, Michael Payne, claims that he was described by various people as "dislikable, vain, excitable, prone to wild talk, unstable and with a mental outlook bordering on the pathological. All agreed, however, that his military bearing, coupled with his general appearance - he stood at six feet, with dark brown hair and moustache, and piercing blue eyes - belied his psychological problems and endowed him with charismatic force."

British Union of Fascists
In November 1930, Charles Bentinck Budd was elected to the Town Council as the independent representative of Ham Ward in Broadwater. At an election meeting on 16th October 1933, Budd revealed he was now a member of the British Union of Fascists (BUF). He was duly re-elected and the national press reported that Worthing was the first town in the country to elect a Fascist councillor. Worthing was now described as the "Munich of the South".

Sir Oswald Mosley, now announced that Budd was the BUF Administration Officer for Sussex . On Friday 1st December 1933, the BUF held its first public meeting in Worthing in the Old Town Hall. According to the author of Storm Tide: Worthing 1933-1939 (2008): "It was crowded to capacity, with the several rows of seats normally reserved for municipal dignitaries and magistrates now occupied by forbidding, youthful men arrived in black Fascist uniforms, in company with several equally young women dressed in black blouses and grey skirts."

The Labour Party in Worthing was very angry about the election of Budd and they passed a resolution with a view to forming a united opposition movement of the "liberal and democratic bodies of the town to meet on a common platform to combat the menace of Fascism". It was agreed to distribute anti-Fascist literature and propaganda and to link up with kindred organisations in order to form a nationwide front against Fascism."

Fascism in Worthing
On 4th January, 1934, Budd reported that over 150 people in Worthing had joined the British Union of Fascists. He claimed that the greatest intake had come from increasingly disaffected Conservatives. The Weekly Fascist News described the growth in membership as "phenomenal". Budd also announced that local communists had broken into his offices at 27 Marine Parade and stolen 96 BUF badges, together with cigarettes and £2.2s.8d in cash. However, soon afterwards the police arrested Cyril Mitchell of 16 Leigh Road, Broadwater. Mitchell, who admitted the offence, was in fact a young Blackshirt, who had broken into the offices after a night out in the pub. He told the police, "something came over me… I had too much beer".

The mayor of Worthing, Harry Duffield, the leader of the Conservative Party in the town, was most favourably impressed with the Blackshirts and congratulated them on the disciplined way they had marched through the streets of Worthing. He reported that employers in the town had written to him giving their support for the British Union of Fascists. They had "no objection to their employees wearing the black shirt even at work; and such public spirited action on their part was much appreciated."

On 26th January, 1934, William Joyce, the deputy leader of the BUF, addressed a public meeting at the Pier Pavilion. Over 900 people turned up to hear Joyce speak. In his speech he pledged to free British industry from foreigners, "be they Hebrew or any other form of alien." Joyce ended his two-hour speech with: "Reclaim what is your own in the fullness of Fascist victory!"

John Robert Peryer, of Allendyne, 24 Offington Gardens, a maths teacher at the Worthing High School for Boys (WHSB) became one of the leaders of the anti-Fascist movement in Worthing. Along with Marion Barber he established the International Friendship League, an organisation attempting to "foster peace and harmony between groups of young people from a spectrum of European nations." Peryer's parents were themselves refugees and along with his wife Harriet Peryer, spent their adult life in promoting international friendship.

A photograph taken in January 1917. Left to right: A prison wardress,Hettie Wheeldon, Winnie Mason and Alice Wheeldon.
John Robert Peryer with Marion Barber at Beach House
It was announced that Charles Budd had arranged for Sir Oswald Mosley and William Joyce to address a meeting at the Pavilion on 9th October, 1934. The venue was packed with fascist supporters. The meeting was disrupted when a few hecklers were ejected by hefty East End bouncers. Mosley, however, continued his speech undaunted, telling his audience that Britain's enemies would have to be deported: "We were assaulted by the vilest mob you ever saw in the streets of London - little East End Jews, straight from Poland. Are you really going to blame us for throwing them out?"

Warwick Street Riot
At the close of the proceedings the main body of uniformed Fascists, led by Joyce, emerged from the Pavilion on to the Esplanade. It was estimated that there were 2,000 people waiting outside. The crowd surged forward and several fights began. A ninety-six-year-old woman, Doreen Hodgkins, was struck on the head by a Blackshirt before being escorted away. When the Blackshirts retreated inside, the crowd began to chant: "Poor old Mosley's got the wind up!"

Oswald Mosley
Oswald Mosley and the Blackshirts.
The author of Storm Tide: Worthing 1933-1939 (2008) has pointed out: "By this time all nineteen available members of the Borough's police force had been called out, and through their combined efforts a lane through the crowd was forced open from the Pavilion steps across the Esplanade to Marine Parade. But as Joyce and his re-formed black-shirted cohort passed along it they were constantly barracked and jostled; while the sudden appearance of Sir Oswald himself, together with the bodyguards of his Defence Force, led to a further outbreak of scuffles on the Esplanade as large numbers of spectators eagerly closed in upon him. One Blackshirt was knocked to the ground and there were shouts for Sir Oswald to be thrown into the sea... Despite such imprecations, however, the mood of the majority remained largely good-natured: most people, prompted by curiosity and awe, simply wanting to get a closer, more proper, look at such a famous yet notorious figure. But Sir Oswald, clearly out of countenance and feeling menaced, at once ordered his tough, battle-hardened bodyguards - all of imposing physique and, like their leader, towering over the policemen on duty - to close ranks and adopt their fighting stance which, unsurprisingly, as all were trained boxers, had been modelled on, and closely resembled, that of a prize fighter."

Chris Hare, the author of Historic Worthing (2008) has argued: "Mosley, accompanied by William Joyce, left the Pavilion and, protected by a large body of blackshirts, crossed over the road to Barnes's cafe in the Arcade. Stones and rotten vegetables were soon crashing through the windows of the cafe. Boys were observed firing peashooters at the beleaguered Fascists, while some youths were taking aim with air rifles. Meanwhile a group of young men climbed onto the roof of the Arcade and dislodged a large piece of masonry, which plummeted to earth through the arcade, landing only feet away from the Fascist leader. Things were getting too hot for the Fascists, who made a run for it, up the Arcade into Montague Street, then into South Street. Their intention was presumably to reach either their headquarters in Ann Street, or The Fountain in South Street, known as a 'Fascist pub', but they were ambushed on the corner of Warwick Street by local youths. Hearing the row, more Fascists hurried down from the Fountain to go to Mosley's aid. Fights broke out, bodies were slung against shop windows, and startled residents threw open their windows to see a seething mass of entangled bodies desperately struggling for control of the junction between South Street and Warwick Street."

A photograph taken in January 1917. Left to right: A prison wardress,Hettie Wheeldon, Winnie Mason and Alice Wheeldon.
The Battle of Warwick Street
Superintendent Bristow later claimed that a crowd of about 400 people attempted to stop the Blackshirts from getting to their headquarters. A series of fights took place and several people were injured. Francis Skilton, a solicitor's clerk who had left his home at 30 Normandy Road to post a letter at the Central Post Office in Chapel Road, and got caught up in the fighting. A witness, John Birts, later told the police that Skilton had been "savagely attacked by at least three Blackshirts." It was not until 11.00 p.m. that the police managed to clear the area.

Charles Bentinck Budd and Harry Jones
In December, 1934, Budd was involved in a dispute with Harry Jones, that resulted in him being arrested by the police. According to the newspaper report: "An allegation that he threatened a subordinate with a revolver was made when a Fascist official, Charles Henry Bentinck Budd, of Grove View, Worthing, appeared before Horsham Magistrates yesterday.... Budd, a member of the West Sussex County Council, and district administration officer of the British Union of Fascists for the West Sussex and Hants area, appeared in custody on a warrant taken out by Harry Jones, of Horsham, officer in charge of the Horsham Branch of the British Union of Fascists. Jones said Budd had used threats, and he was in fear of bodily injury as a result... In evidence, Mr Jones said he was formerly in charge of Worthing Fascists, and Budd was the area commander and his superior officer. About five weeks ago he was told there were differences between Budd and his wife. He saw Budd and his wife, and offered to act as mediator. Budd said he would not have anybody interfering with his private affairs. Mrs Budd had left her husband, but (Jones) was not at liberty to disclose where she had gone. Mr Jones told of occasions when he said he was threatened by Budd because he could not disclose Mrs Budd's address. On December 31, he said, he went with Budd in his car to the Old Forge House, Lancing." When they were inside a room Budd closed the door, and producing a revolver, said - "If you don't get my wife's address now, I will take you to a shed and shoot you like a dog." Budd was found not guilty of the charge.

Worthing and Nazi Germany
Budd continued to get support for the British Union of Fascists in the town. Redgrave Cripps, the Worthing architect, and his wife, spent three months in Nazi Germany in the summer of 1935. He commented that they were "simply amazed at the wonderful progress that has been made since we were last there five years ago." Cripps argued that "despondency and despair had been replaced by optimism, efficiency, unity, amazing energy and bursting vitality; the whole nation seemingly inspired with a new and great ideal in which all classes seemed genuinely to believe with the intensity of a religious fervour."

R. G. Martin, the headmaster of Worthing High School for Boys, had originally been critical of the Budd's attempts to form a branch of the BUF in the town. At the annual dinner of the Old Azurian's Association, he said that he did not expect former pupils to join as they had "cold common sense among those who had the best education the town could offer." However, in August 1935, he controversially took a school party to Nazi Germany with their production of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night . On their return, Max Fuller, the head of WHSB's Dramatic Society, reported that in Germany "Hitler is looked upon as the saviour of the country."

A photograph taken in January 1917. Left to right: A prison wardress,Hettie Wheeldon, Winnie Mason and Alice Wheeldon.
R. G. Martin meets members of Hitler Youth in March, 1936.
The following year Martin invited 15 members of the Hitler Youth to visit Worthing High School for Boys. They arrived in March 1936. The local historian, Freddie Feest, argues: "It has since been well documented that there were ulterior motives for most such visits and that German youth with strong Nazi-influenced motivation were surreptitiously – though with various degrees of success and reliability – collecting information, documents and photographs during their tours that might prove invaluable when the time came for Nazi forces to carry out an invasion of that country."

Feest suspects that the visit was arranged because members of staff were sympathetic to fascism: "So, had R.G.Martin been duped by the Nazi propaganda machine into believing such a visit was merely culturally inspired? Possibly. Certainly, according to several former pupils, their headmaster and at least one other teacher involved with the trip to Germany were ‘greatly impressed by and demonstrably sympathetic to' many of the Nazi ideals projected during the two-way visits."

Charles Bentinck Budd Interned
Despite the best efforts of people like the headmaster of Worthing High School for Boys, war broke out with Germany on 3rd September, 1939. Soon after Winston Churchill became prime minister, the British government announced the imposition of Defence Regulation 18B. This legislation, passed on 22nd May, 1940, gave the Home Secretary the right to imprison without trial anybody he believed likely to "endanger the safety of the realm". One of the first people to be arrested was Charles Bentinck Budd. While in prison Budd's house in Grove Road was damaged during a German air raid.

Budd was released on 27th May, 1941. Two years later Budd he sued two members of the government, Sir John Anderson and Herbert Morrison, for damages. According to one newspaper report: "Complaint that a former county councillor was put into a bug-infested cell at Brixton Prison, kept in solitary confinement, and paraded in public at railway stations under armed guard was made in London today. Captain Charles Harry Bentinck Budd, R.E., a member from 1930 to 1936 of West Sussex County Council and Worthing Borough Council, who served in the last war and was severely wounded, sued Sir John Anderson and Mr Herbert Morrison, past and present Home Secretaries, and Mr Thomas Broadwood Williamson, of the Home Office, in connection with his detention under Defence Regulation 18b, claiming damages for false imprisonment." Budd lost his case.

Charles Bentinck Budd died in Eastbourne on 8th April, 1967.

By John Simkin ([email protected]) © September 1997 (updated August 2014).

▲ Main Article ▲
Primary Sources
(1) Chris Hare, Historic Worthing (2008)
Despite local hostility, the Fascist branch in Worthing was one of the most successful in the south of England, a fact that Captain Budd was keen to stress in an interview with the press: "Fascism is the one thing that will sage this country from the trouble for which it is heading! When I was put in charge of this area was given to understand that I would find things slow in West Sussex; but now I find the people very eager and interested in our movement." In recognition of the hard work being done in Worthing for the movement, it was arranged for Mosley to hold a Fascist rally at the Pavilion in Worthing on 9 October 1934. In the meantime Captain Budd was once again grabbing the local headlines. He stormed out of the Town Hall when other councillors refused to give him the committee places he desired. And he attacked the Council fur its police of banning the Fascists from holding open-air meetings on the site of the old fish market near the pier. He protested that the Salvation Army was allowed to hold meetings there, so why not the Fascists, but was bluntly told that this privilege was only extended to religious bodies.

The night of 9 October proved to be a desperate affair, one local newspaper describing the night's events as more akin to revolutionary Spain than one would usually expect in an English town. As Mosley addressed a carefully vetted audience in the Pavilion, an angry mob gathered outside. The meeting, stage-managed to the least detail, was disrupted when a small hand of intruders let off a number of squibs, and had to be ejected by hefty East End bouncers....

After the rally, Mosley, accompanied by William Joyce, left the Pavilion and, protected by a large body of blackshirts, crossed over the road to Barnes's cafe in the Arcade. Stones and rotten vegetables were soon crashing through the windows of the cafe. Boys were observed firing peashooters at the beleaguered Fascists, while some youths were taking aim with air rifles. Meanwhile a group of young men climbed onto the roof of the Arcade and dislodged a large piece of masonry, which plummeted to earth through the arcade, landing only feet away from the Fascist leader. Things were getting too hot for the Fascists, who made a run for it, up the Arcade into Montague Street, then into South Street. Their intention was presumably to reach either their headquarters in Ann Street, or The Fountain in South Street, known as a "Fascist pub", but they were ambushed on the corner of Warwick Street by local youths. Hearing the row, more Fascists hurried down from the Fountain to go to Mosley's aid. Fights broke out, bodies were slung against shop windows, and startled residents thrcxv open their windows to see a seething mass of entangled bodies desperately struggling for control of the junction between South Street and Warwick Street. Only the arrival of a large force of police defused the situation. Several blackshirts were arrested and led away to the cheers of the crowd.

Mosley made two more public appearances in Worthing during the 1930s. On both occasions the police visited the houses of several local young men during the days before, confiscating catapults and air rifles. These meetings were, however, more low-key, and the Fascists never again tried to march en masse through the streets of the town. The antipathy felt towards the Fascists again manifested itself on 5 November 1934. During the previous days several Worthing boys and men known to be hostile to the Fascists had been waylaid at night and beaten up. Bonfire Night saw several cases of retaliation. At least one blackshirt was thrown in the sea, and others had to run the fiery gauntlet. Cars were stopped, and passengers scrutinised before being allowed to pass on. A group of nearly a thousand people gathered outside a hotel, where it was alleged a number of Fascist leaders were staying. A plentiful supply of squibs and crackers were thrown up at the windows, as the crowd howled its fury. Presently a window opened, and several buckets of cold water were showered down on the besieging party. The arrival of the police prevented an escalation of the disturbances, but not before Worthing had truly resurrected the spirit of Bonfire Nights past.

Superintendent Bristow's comment, quoted in the national press, that the Fascists were "just very nice Worthing people", caused a certain degree of embarrassment, and he retired from his post a few months later. Due to the perceived improvement in the law and order situation in the town, the police had not for some years been Issued with helmets, caps being considered quite adequate. From 1935-37 the police were reissued with helmets. Bonfire Night remained a problem, and after the war became extremely disorderly, culminating in a serious riot on the night of 5 November 1958, after which stringent measures were taken to suppress the wild excesses of the "Bonfire Boys" once and for all.
(2) Michael Payne, Storm Tide: Worthing 1933-1939 (2008)
Still anxious to speak to the people of Worthing himself where, he had become convinced, his movement had built up a strong position, and he himself would receive a warm reception, Sir Oswald announced that he would address a meeting at the Pavilion on October 9. Prior to the event, those supporters who wished to meet him, briefly but privately, were invited to apply in writing to Captain Budd, who from amongst their number selected those with the most "serious and earnest enquiries to make." Also to be admitted into his presence were representatives of both the BUF Sussex and Hampshire HQs, who would use the occasion to present their leader with a portrait of himself embossed in relief on a bronze plaque.

"Hear Moseley at the Pavilion," ran the Fascist advertisement in the local press in heralding his forthcoming appearance, below which, in an accompanying box, was depicted a simple but striking line drawing in ink of the Fascist leader. In company with a score or so members of his Defence Force, he duly arrived from London in a black lorry, the windows of which had been covered in protective wire netting; but even though the vehicle also contained several so called "ambulance" men, who were regularly on hand at rallies to treat casualties, he was hardly expecting any serious trouble. However, in looking upon Worthing as a relatively safe and peaceful haven for himself and his followers, in contrast to the Socialist cauldrons of London and the industrial cities of the Midlands and North - a town, in fact, ever more receptive to, and supportive of, his Fascist creed - he was soon to be disabused of such a misguided notion. An inkling of what might transpire during his sojourn in the Borough might have been gathered from the sensational daubing of paint on the facade of the Town Hall, during the night prior to the meeting, of the slogans: "Damn Moseley! Fight Fascism! No more War;" or from the tarspattered Georgian facade of the BUF HQ on Marine Parade and the similarly besmirched crazy paving at the home of Captain Budd.

The following evening, as the meeting inside got under way, the crowd gathering outside the Pavilion grew steadily larger, with accompanying shouts and cat-calls, the sharp explosions of firecrackers and the whooshing of rockets; while more emboldened individuals hammered continuously on the bolted doors of the auditorium and on the iron supports of the Pier beneath it. But at this stage the kerfuffle appeared more akin to high-spiritedness than violent disturbance, with even the watchful black-shirted stewards generally Ignoring the commotion. To David Bernard Trent of Park Road, the whole affair seemed to be a joke on the part of the crowd - which, he further observed, was just as well, for at 7.30 p.m. lie could discern just four policemen in attendance. Posted by Superintendent Bristow, as far as these youthful looking 'Bristow Babies' were concerned, they were faced by a peaceful gathering simply letting off a few fireworks.

Within the Pavilion itself the meeting went off in an orderly enough manner - although hearing that the event might be stormy at least one lady arrived having taken the precaution of concealing a Life Preserver in her attire - for although the house was packed the audience was largely composed of Fascist supporters, including contingents from London and all parts of Sussex. Prior to the actual start, a file of black-bloused young women had formed up in the Foyer to hail the arrival of their leader, but prudently he had entered the theatre by means of the stage door at the rear. With less foresight his mother had entered by the front entrance where she had been startled by a fire cracker being thrown at her. Finally the curtain rose to reveal Sir Oswald himself standing alone on the stage. Clad entirely in black, his great silver belt buckle gleaming, his right arm raised in the Fascist salute, lie was spellbindingly illuminated in the hushed, almost reverential atmosphere by the glare of spotlights from right, left and centre. A forest of black-sleeved arms immediately shot up to hail him, but finding himself completely blinded, the dramatic effect was immediately shattered by his opening words requesting that the centre beam be switched off...

Again the police intervened to restore order and with shouts, accusations and insults ringing in his ears Sir Oswald was enabled, in company with his mother and bodyguards, to reach Marine Parade. His immediate destination was Barnes Cafe, almost directly opposite, but before entering it he led his troops, attired in their heavy boots and riding breeches, fists clenched and elbows stuck out, in a defiantly ostentatious and provocative march around the adjacent South Street traffic island. Several tomatoes were thrown at them, but an easier target was provided by a group of Fascist women crossing Marine Parade at the same moment. One tomato struck the unfortunate Winifred Collins on her left eye, an experience which she afterwards described as "very squashy." Mary Hodges, on the other hand, was struck by the filthy and hostile language hurled at her by many of the onlookers; while her companion, Florence Spiers - herself hit on the head by a tomato - noted that the crowd was very far from being "the nice friendly one composed of old ladies and cripples" she had been led to expect.

Gathered at last in the comparative safety of the Cafe, which had been gained amid a cascade of fire crackers, nevertheless, from outside the Blackshirts continued to be subject to a barrage of taunts and threats, which included: "Come out Moseley and show yourself, or we'll come in and get you;" "Come out you dirty coward;" "Down with'em, kill'em;" together with the chant: "One, two, three, four, five, we want Moseley dead or alive." To avoid being struck by
tomatoes being thrown in at them, a number of which had already bespattered the waitresses, or wounded by pellets being fired from an air pistol by a youth of about sixteen from the Esplanade's balustrade, those inside the Cafe shut the windows: but as these began to be smashed by stones from the beach, Sir Oswald, following a hasty discussion with Joyce, ordered his second-in-command to create a diversion by leading his own fifteen or so bodyguards in a march up South Street to the branch HQ in Warwick Street.

As they left the Cafe, in company with a contingent of Fascist women and local supporters, they were indeed, as they had anticipated, immediately accompanied by a sizeable section of the crowd, which immediately broke into boos, shouted insults and chants of The Red Front. Both groups broke into a run, during which, in attempting to protect a Fascist woman, a Blackshirt, Mr. Chamberlain, was knocked violently to the ground. "Go home and wash your husband's shirt and cook his dinner," bellowed an incensed man at the equally dazed woman. On gaining the western entrance to Warwick Street, the Blackshirts found it blocked by a further, larger, and even more hostile group, many among which mockingly raised their arms in the Communist salute. Deciding to detour through Market Street, here, too, they found the roadway and pavements thronging with people, several of whom, spoiling for a fight, were only too eager to embroil themselves in brawls with the beleaguered Fascists. They were not to be disappointed, and as one hefty Blackshirt was sent sprawling into a shop doorway by punches from an equally robust "civilian," the battle of Market Street commenced. Immediately several bedroom windows were flung open as startled residents in their night attire peeped from behind curtains at the melee below in terror and amazement.

Meanwhile, just as Sir Oswald was preparing to slip away from the Cafe - before it could be further damaged and in order to quell the growing alarm of the proprietor and the several remaining women Fascists - word reached him of the dire predicament Joyce and his men were in. Darting out onto the pavement and breaking into a double, Sir Oswald and his cohort of bodyguards sped east along Marine Parade before turning left into Bedford Row and thence to the eastern entrance to Market Street where, with himself as the spearhead, they immediately charged from the rear the mob assailing Joyce's force. Caught completely off guard by this unforeseen sally - subsequently dubbed by the national press as the "Charge of the Black Brigade" - the crowd, faltering, began to break up and disperse, and within minutes the re-united and reassembled, bloodied but undaunted Blackshirts were able to turn their attention to the clearing of Warwick Street and the relief of their beleaguered HQ.

Here too the crowd was dense, numbering nearly four hundred - a situation Police Sergeant Heritage described as "very ugly" - and as the cavalcade of Blackshirts attempted to march back and forth, cries of "We'll give Moseley a hot time" and "Come on lads, get stuck into them" heralded the outbreak of further violence. Warwick Street - dubbed by the community the "Bond Street of Worthing" - was soon a seething, howling, mass of struggling bodies but in a series of powerful rushes, during which numerous people were knocked to the ground, thrown aside or sent thudding against shop windows, the hefty, disciplined Blackshirts finally began to cut swathes through, and break up, the unruly mob. But not before sustaining several casualties themselves, amongst whom was Sir Oswald, who in trying to gain the door of the HQ received a punch under his left eye and a second to the jaw; an action which spurred a gang of Brighton roughs to press toward him, only to be baulked by those Fascists gathered at the doorway hurrying to rally around their leader...

Robert Poore, meanwhile, an Italian Post Office messenger living at 26, Loder Gardens, when initially confronted himself by Black-shirtecl assailants, had pleaded with them that he "did not understand British;" to which came the sardonic reply that they did not understand Italian, a sarcasm followed by the delivery of several Weighty punches to his head. Sustaining severe facial cuts, he too was removed to hospital. Not one child was hurt, however, the police having had the foresight to order home any amongst the spectators long before any violence threatened. One boy disappointed not to have been present was nine-year-old Clifford *****, who had previously overheard his uncles Norman and Edin Williams, both members of the local Territorial "C" Company 4 Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment, discussing at the room they shared at their mother's boarding house at 17 West Buildings how they intended to "sort the Blackshirts Out."

With the arrival of more and more police detachments drafted in from outside the Borough, by 11 p.m. the battle of Warwick Street, too, drew to a close. Now, with only sporadic boos and shouts being directed towards the Blackshirts the atmosphere among the crowd quietened - pierced only at one point by an enthusiastic cheer as Police Constables Ridge and Griffin escorted Bernard Mullens, a Chelsea Fascist, to the police station on suspicion of his having taken part in the assault on Robert Poore. There, nursing a damaged right hand himself, Mullens denied the charge, but nevertheless was remanded in custody for a week - unlike the assailant of Captain Budd who, despite the hitter's forceful demands that a charge of assault be made upon him, was merely cautioned to leave Warwick Street and return home.

At the same time a summons was issued against Sir Oswald for assaulting Jack Pritchard of 81 Ham Road, outside the Pavilion, although the Fascist leader protested that he had merely been protecting himself from a "violent rough" who had lunged forward and punched him on the left cheek bone. He had been pushed from behind, retorted Mr. Pritchard, had fallen forward, and it was then he had been thumped. To prevent a second punch he had caught hold of Sir Oswald's sleeve, but had then been the recipient of several more hefty blows from behind. He also denied the allegation levelled at him by Captain Budd that he had confided to a "certain man" that the police were using him as a "pawn in their game," or that if he had been in Sir Oswald's position himself he would have acted to protect himself in a like manner.


(3) The Western Morning News (15th November 1934)
The summons for alleged assault brought against Sir Oswald Mosley, leader of the British Union of Fascists, following a disturbance after a Fascist meeting here on October 9, was dismissed to-day. The magistrates reached this decision after further evidence had been called for the defence. The Bench held a consultation, and Mr. A. F. Somerset (the chairman) announced that they were agreed the charge should be dismissed.

Mr. St. John Hutchinson, who appeared for Sir Oswald, asked if he could confine to Warwick-street the remainder of the evidence on the charge of alleged riotous assembly. The Bench said that they could not dissociate one from the other. They had heard sufficient evidence to the trouble around the café.

Sir Oswald and three men were summoned for alleged riotous assembly. The other men were William Joyce, described as director of Fascist propaganda; Capt. Charles Henry Budd, described as Blackshirt officer for West Sussex area: and Bernard Mullans, stated to be a member of the movement. Mullans was also summoned for alleged assault. All men denied the charges. Joyce, in evidence, said that any suggestion that they came down to Worthing to beat up the crowd was ridiculous in the highest degree. They were menaced and insulted by people in the crowd.

Mullans stated that he told Poore that he should be ashamed for using insulting language in the presence of women. Poore hit him in eye, and he (Mullans) then hit him in the mouth. The case was adjourned till tomorrow.

(4) The Sunday Post (6th January, 1935)
An allegation that he threatened a subordinate with a revolver was made when a Fascist official, Charles Henry Bentinck Budd, of Grove View, Worthing, appeared before Horsham Magistrates yesterday. The man who made the allegation said the threat followed his offer to act as mediator between Budd and Mrs Budd. The Magistrates said no order would be made, and Budd was at once discharged.

Budd, a member of the West Sussex County Council, and district administration officer of the British Union of Fascists for the West Sussex and Hants area, appeared in custody on a warrant taken out by Harry Jones, of Horsham, officer in charge of the Horsham Branch of the British Union of Fascists. Jones said Budd had used threats, and he was in fear of bodily injury as a result. Budd, who was defended by Mr H. V. O. Jackson, denied the charges. Mr J. Ireland Eager appeared for the prosecution.

In evidence, Mr Jones said he was formerly in charge of Worthing Fascists, and Budd was the area commander and his superior officer. About five weeks ago he was told there were differences between Budd and his wife. He saw Budd and his wife, and offered to act as mediator. Budd said he would not have anybody interfering with his private affairs. Mrs Budd had left her husband, but (Jones) was not at liberty to disclose where she had gone. Mr Jones told of occasions when he said he was threatened by Budd because he could not disclose Mrs Budd's address. On December 31, he said, he went with Budd in his car to the Old Forge House, Lancing. When they were inside a room Budd closed the door, and producing a revolver, said - "If you don't get my wife's address now, I will take you to a shed and shoot you like a dog." He disclosed the address, and Budd transferred him to the Horsham branch.

Capt. Budd called at Horsham on January 2 in a very agitated state and seething with temper. He made a serious accusation concerning his (Jones's) relations with Mrs Budd. Jones said he replied - "I emphatically deny that." Budd said, "I will shoot you like a dog. You are a disgrace to Fascism, and if it costs every penny I have, I will follow you to the end of the world, and get you in the end." Police came, and he was taken home in a police car.

Budd, in the witness-box, denied using any threat. He said that in December Mrs Budd and her son went to Holland for a holiday, and he was unable to go. He learned from Jones on December 19 that Mrs Budd had rung up Jones on the telephone from London. He heard Jones had been to London to see her, but Jones refused to disclose her address. Budd said he did not threaten Jones, but pointed out to him that he had been mixed up in other people's private affairs, in one of which he was beaten up by one of the men concerned. He (Budd) told him that if he interfered with his affairs he would probably get similar treatment.

(5) The Evening Telegraph (1st June 1943)
Complaint that a former county councillor was put into a bug-infested cell at Brixton Prison, kept in solitary confinement, and paraded in public at railway stations under armed guard was made in London to-day. Captain Charles Harry Bentinck Budd, R.E., a member from 1930 to 1936 of West Sussex County Council and Worthing Borough Council, who served in the last war and was severely wounded, sued Sir John Anderson and Mr Herbert Morrison, past and present Home Secretaries, and Mr Thomas Broadwood Williamson, of the Home Office, in connection with his detention under Defence Regulation 18b, claiming damages for false imprisonment.

Mr Scott Henderson, for Captain Budd, said Sir John Anderson was responsible for his arrest on June 15, 1940, and Mr Herbert Morrison for keeping him in custody until May 27, 1941, when Captain Budd was released by order of the High Court. Mr Williamson was the executive officer who instructed the police to carry out the arrest. "Captain Budd," counsel continued, "puts himself before the court as a loyal Englishman who has faithfully served his country in many different capacities, and who has been unlawfully imprisoned and subjected to the grossest indignities. Association with Fascists."

As a member of the Sussex Special Constabulary, Captain Budd was commended by Mr Justice Cassels when Recorder of Brighton. He was serving in the Royal Engineers until his arrest, which was made on the ground of his association with the West Sussex branch of the British Union of Fascists. Captain Budd ceased activities as a B.U.F. organiser in March, 1937. In May, 1941, on a writ of habeas corpus, a King's Bench divisional court ordered his discharge. Captain Budd relied on that decision as a finding that his imprisonment was unlawful because of an irregularity in the document under which he was arrested. The defence was a denial of the allegations.


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RichardWSymonds
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Re: R.W. SYMONDS - I AM NOT HE

Postby RichardWSymonds » Tue Feb 02, 2016 8:20 pm

EMBLEM - WEMYSS

http://www.scotclans.com/scottish-clans/clan-wemyss/

RichardWSymonds wrote:https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Wemyss

WEMYSS (as in Robert Wemyss Symonds : R.W. Symonds)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clan_Wemyss

James Wemyss's great-grandson married Millicent, daughter of Lady Augusta Gordon,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lady_Augusta_Gordon
and illegitimate granddaughter of William IV of the United Kingdom.[2] Their son, Michael Wemyss, married Lady Victoria Cavendish-Bentinck, last surviving god-daughter of Queen Victoria.[2]
http://www.independent.co.uk/news/peopl ... 35368.html



Letter published in West Sussex County Times (January 14 2016 - "Exploration of 'hidden histories'") and West Sussex Gazette (January 20 2016 - "Exhibition on political history tells many an untold story")

http://www.wscountytimes.co.uk/news/let ... -1-7160212

Dear Editor

Horsham Museum's 2015 Exhibition on political history tells many an untold story.

Horsham had a reputation of being one of the country's most corrupt towns in 1295AD. In that year, when Parliament was first called, a parliamentary seat was sold for £4000 in which £80,000 went on bribes. This was at a time when only 52 people could vote in the town - often for just a figurehead who was drafted in by the local Lord, or at the request of the King.

As Jeremy Knight of the Horsham Museum says: "The history of politics and Parliament is a fascinating story. Corruption was endemic at one point"

The 2015 Exhibition, marking the 750th Anniversary when Parliament was first called, also tells the untold story of the British Union of Fascists (BUF), led by Oswald Mosley.
Horsham had a BUF base in West Street and Denne Road - with the West Sussex Headquarters in Marine Parade, Worthing - dubbed the "The Munich of the South Coast" (see photograph attached).

The long-serving local MP at the time, representing both Horsham and Worthing, was Edward Turnour - 6th Earl of Winterton. It is claimed he was in sympathy with Oswald Mosley's politics during those pre-war years. After the war, he became Baron Turnour of Shillinglee in the County of Sussex, which gave him a seat in the House of Lords until the title became extinct on his death in 1962.

In 1910, when the Baron was a young man of 27, the UK Times reported he was engaged to Ivy Gordon-Lennox (whose uncle was the 7th Duke of Richmond). Ivy's mother was none too pleased, and placed a notice in the New York Times to state there was no such engagement!
In 1915, Ivy married William Cavendish-Bentinck, Marquess of Titchfield, and then became Duchess of Portland.

In 1924, Baron Turnour married the Honourable Cecilia Monica Wilson, daughter of Charles Wilson, 2nd Baron Nunburnholme (and Lady Majorie Cecilia Wynn-Carrington).

Such 'hidden histories' are no longer hidden at Horsham Museum's 2015 Exhibition. It's worth a visit.


Yours sincerely


Richard W. Symonds
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